8 Comments
Mar 4Liked by Tom Orbach

I couldn't agree more :)

It's a very common practice to write the release notes before you write the product documentation 🤓

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author

Totally :) All based on Amazon's working backward method: https://www.productplan.com/glossary/working-backward-amazon-method/

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Mar 3·edited Mar 3Liked by Tom Orbach

This applies well to developing a Substack newsletter. When you're not getting enough traction it's easy to focus on how to improve promotion. But probably better (and more satisfying) to keep working on the content 📝

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Easier said than done. Not all products have a wide appeal, I can see this strategy being used successfully in a b2c kind of product

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author

Interesting! It's not really about having a wide appeal but rather about nailing the solution, its simplicity, and its demand in the market. Imagining the demo is difficult when the product is 'all over the place' and not solving any burning pain.

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Sounds very simple but soo insightful. Thanka for sharing that!

As a seasoned marketing expert, I know from first hand experience how not to nail those 3 essentials and desperately watching people being fooled by vanity measures. Then everyone is surprised and marketing is to blame when product adoption is low since it looked so nice and fancy :D

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Mar 1·edited Mar 1Liked by Tom Orbach

Awesome life lesson!

There is a quote by Naval that I love related to this subject:

"You’re doing sales because you failed at marketing.

You’re doing marketing because you failed at product."

One question came to mind.

You mentioned needing to say: "Wait, before the demo, we need to fix the product."

I've struggled with this in my career.

What is your advice to people who are not in the position to affect the product enough, or just didn't succeed in doing it?

Like you said, it can be tough to do marketing for a bad or mediocre product.

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author

Love this quote! I think every employee must have a 'founder' mindset and push for changes beyond their role (even if they're not in that position officially).

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